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A lot of people in pop have taken acid and all of them have softened up and lost a lot of drive and basic ambition. Life can only be seen by being involved in real life, and not a lot of nebulous and ethereal ideas. Love is an aggressive and possessive thing - it's not just 'Forgive thy neighbour and be nice to everyone.

— Pete Townshend

Melody Maker - 12/30/1967

Today in the Who's History


The Detours play at the Goldhawk Social Club in Shepherd's Bush


A show at St. Matthew's Hall in Norwich is cancelled after the band's van is incapable of getting through snowdrifts across the road.


The Who play the Winter Gardens in Malvern. It is reported that CBS-TV U.S. filmed the show for CBS Reports.


The Who play the Union Catholic High School Gymnasium in Scotch Plains, New Jersey. The supporting act is the Decoys. Admission is $2.50.


The Who play the first of two nights at The Warehouse in New Orleans. This show is later booted as Gutter Punks At A Warehouse.


The Who play at the Chicago International Amphitheater. Backstage, Graham Hughes puts The Who in football helmets to shoot the sleeve for Odds And Sods. Due to size problems, Pete and Roger switch helmets.


The Who play the Rupp Arena in Lexington, Kentucky


Pete releases his first post-Who solo album. White City - A Novel is the soundtrack to a short film that is released simultaneously with the LP as a videotape. In the film, Pete plays a version of himself, visiting an old working-class friend who lives in the titular housing project and is recently divorced from a swimming instructor. The film is followed by an explanatory interview by Pete and an in-studio performance of the otherwise-unreleased song “Night School. “ Positive reviews for the album come from Variety, Michael Tearson in Audio, Bill Milkowski in Down Beat and Rob Tannenbaum in Rolling Stone, both of the latter calling it Pete's best work since Empty Glass. Negative reviews, however, tend to be very negative with slams by Billy Altman in Spin ( “pretentiously boring “), Will Smith in Melody Maker ( “a pitiful specimen “) and Craig Zeller in Creem who says Pete should give it up as far as rock 'n' roll is concerned. The film is reviewed by Stephen Holden in The New York Times who, although he enjoys the musical performances, finds the rest odd and moody with overblown symbolism. Deidre Rockmaker in Goldmine also gives the film a bad review, but positive reviews come from Ned Geesin in People ( “tremendously touching “), Tony Seideman in Rolling Stone ( “art with a capital A “) and Louis Meredith in Stereo Review who compares it favorably with the work of John Cassavetes. The album peaks at #70 in the U.K. but reaches #26 in the U.S. It is the last record to date by The Who or one of its members to reach the American Top Forty.


Pete appears on The Jan Payne Show on BBC Radio 5 for a live interview promoting his upcoming radio play version of Lifehouse. On the same day, The Radio Times prints an interview with Pete in which he says he's not gay, he has a girlfriend, and he and his wife Karen are now separated.
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